Dance Halls and Last Calls

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All sample files are Click on Titles of songs for sample sounds. 
Beale Street Mama- Roy Lee Brown
Westphalia Waltz- Johnny Gimble
Orange Blossom Special- Fiddlin’ Frenchie Burke
I Want My Man- Laura Lee McBride

Your Cheatin Heart- Hank Williams’

Take Me Out To A Dance Hall- Pat Green

Bob Wills Is Still The King- Texas Playboys

Silent Partners- Dickie McBride

American Polka -(Joe Patek Orchestra)  The history of the Patek Orchestra dates back to 1895 when Joe's father, John Patek arrived from Czechoslovakia and started a Polka Band in Central Texas. Numerous sons have joined the band through the years and thetradition of Texas Czech-Bohemian bands has continued with their efforts. Joe Patek's Band Still stays busy performing at dances and social functions through Texas.

 

San Antonio Rose -(Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys)  After Milton Brown's tragic death in 1936, Bob Wills assumed the title of "King of Western Swing" and he became a major influence to many of today's top artists. Born in Kosse, Texas in 1905, his first professional job was at a dance dance where he substituted for his father who was too tipsy to perform. As his career progressed, Wills combined the musical elements of Jazz, fiddle breakdowns, Tin Pan Alley, Blues, Dixieland, Big Band and Mariachi sounds to develop the western swing style of the southwest.

Steel Guitar Rag -(Leon McAuliffe)  "Take it Away Leon," made famous by Bob Wills, referred to steel guitarist, Leon McAuliffe. It made his name a household word while he played with Wills in the 1930s and 1940s. "Steel Guitar Rag" was adapted from a blues song by Sylvester Weaver called "Guitar Rag" and is one of the most famous steel guitar instrumentals in the history of country music

 

 

Whiskey River -(Johnny Bush)  Johnny Bush began his career in 1952 at the Texas Star Inn that was located in Leon Valley, Texas. Known as the "Country Caruso," he has been a favorite in country music circle in Texas and continues to record and perform his traditional sound today. His self-penned "Whisky River" is a tune that Willie Nelson begins each of his show with and stands as one of the greatest dance hall classics of all time.

Get Rhythm -(Johnny Cash)  The big "D" Jamboree was a long-lived Saturday night barn dance that lasted twenty-odd years broadcasting from the Sportatorium in Dallas. Although it never attained the status of the Grand Ole Opry or the Louisiana Hayride, it became the most popular barn dance of region. Guests included Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Ray Price and other acts who would soon become major stars.    

 

Cold, Cold Beer -(Floyd Tillman)  Texas Songwriter/musician/bandleader Ted Daffan, Known for writing such country standards as "Born to Lose," "I'm A Fool to Care'" and "Worried Mind'" started his own record label in Houston in 1955 and three songs from those sessions are included on this compilation. The first song presented here from Daffan Records is from his close friend, Floyd Tillman, who sold the studio to Daffan in the first place. Tillman was pivotal figure in the creation of honky tonk music.

Steppin’ Out

 (Lefty Frizzell)  Lefty was one of the most influential singer/songwriters of the postwar era. “Steppin’ Out,” a tune that Fields wrote with Hank Williams, was recorded as a demo for songwriter Jimmy Fields. It was never released commercially until the song appeared on Dragon Street Record’s “The Guys of the Big ‘D’ Jamboree."  Recorded at Jim Beck’s Studio in Dallas, this treasure from one of the greatest country voices of all time will illustrate to a new generation of listeners just what Lefty Frizzell was all about. Merle Haggard said that Lefty was, “The most unique thing that ever happened to country music.”

 

 

 

I Love You Because  -(Leon Payne)  Known as the “Blind Balladeer,” Leon Payne not only wrote the timeless “I Love You Because” but also two huge songs for Hank Williams, “Lost Highway” and  “They’ll Never Take Her Love Away From Me.” His live recording at the Big “D” Jamboree is a classic rendition of  "I Love You Because," a song that was inspired by his wife.

 

Night Life  -(Pauline Reese)  The pure country voice of Pauline Reese comes to us from her “Trail to Monterrey” CD. Willie Nelson’s classic song is performed by an outstanding group of players and Pauline’s rich and powerful voice keep the song as traditional as Ray Price’s timeless version.

 

 

 

I Never Cared For You -  (Geronimo Trevino III) Singer/Songwriter/Author, Geronimo Trevino recorded this Willie Nelson classic in Nashville in 1995 using such superb players as steel guitar legend Buddy Emmons, fiddler virtuoso Vassar Clements and bass player Roy Husky Jr

 

 

 

Lover's Waltz   -(Steven Fromholz)

Steven Fromholz is one of the Lone Star state's most prolific songwriters and most popular performers.  He has penned popular tunes for John Denver, Willie Nelson, Lyle Lovett (just to name a few), and has made an indelible mark on the history of fine song craftsmanship with such country-folk classics as "Texas Trilogy."  Fromholz is a veteran of the dance hall circuit and points out that, "dancing is one of the most enjoyable things you can do, and a dance hall is one of the most important things a community can build and support."  Just as his music has influenced generations of music fans, Fromholz's "Lover's Waltz" tells the story of three generations Texas dance couples whose enduring love and dedication is acted out on the dance floor.

 

Ragged But Right  -(J.R. Chatwell with Willie Nelson)         J.R. was a pioneer swing fiddler who combined explosive jazz and blues styles in his fiddle work. Over the years he played in Texas dance halls with the likes of Adolph Hofner, The Hi-Flyers, Cliff Bruner, The Light Crust Doughboys, Dickie McBride and Walter Kleypas. A severe stroke in 1968 paralyzed his left hand, but after the initial shock he switched to piano. Through the ensuing recovery years, J.R. had time to experiment with lyrics and keyboards despite the lingering stiffness in his left hand. His musical friends rallied around him in 1982 at Pedernales Studio in Spicewood, Texas to record “Jammin’ with J.R. and Friends.”